Five Interesting Facts About South Carolina Spiders

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Most people don’t like them; in fact many of us even have arachnophobia. But most people don’t realize spiders do a lot of good and in fact, are pretty cool.

South Carolina State Spider

 In 2000 the Carolina Wolf Spider was named South Carolina’s official state spider. While worldwide there are over 2,000 species of wolf spiders, the Carolina Wolf Spider is the largest variety found in North America ranging in size between three and four inches. Colored to blend into their surroundings, the wolf spider has a brown/gray body with a dark center stripe on the stomach and long hairy legs. Not overly aggressive they are wary of humans and shouldn’t be handled. While not poisonous, if bitten you may experience itching. 

The Black and Yellow Argiope Spider, commonly known as the garden spider or the writing spider due to their web patterns, prey mainly on insects captured by their sticky web. Each night the female writing spider digests the old web strands and then gets busy spinning new ones. Writing spiders are not poisonous and will only bite if threatened. Because they consume certain types of flying insects, it is beneficial to have them in yards and outdoor living spaces. 

South Carolina Venomous Spiders

There are only four types of venomous spiders in South Carolina and three belong to the widow family. The southern black, the northern black and the brown widow all bite but only if provoked or startled. And while medical attention is generally a good idea, their bites are very rarely fatal. The other venomous spider is the brown recluse. Often mistaken for the southern house spider, brown recluses are exactly like their name. Often found in crawlspaces, under outbuildings and in dark back corners of an attic or basement, they will attack if physically harmed. Much more dangerous than a widow spider, a brown recluse bite can result in necrotizing ulcers that may take months to heal. 

But what about a daddy longleg spider? Aren’t they poisonous but their fangs just too small to bite humans? Nope, that’s an urban legend. They do have short fangs but research seems to indicate they don’t have the muscle strengthen behind the fangs to be able to penetrate human flesh. 

South Carolina Jumping Spiders

South Carolina is home to two different varieties of jumping spiders. The zebra jumping spider is normally found indoors, while the bold jumping spider lives outside in flower beds and gardens. Both are considered good spiders, eating many different species of pests including flies and stinkbugs. Both bold and zebra jumping spiders are small and stout with striking white and/or red markings and as the name indicates, they certainly can jump! In fact, it has been estimated they can jump ten times their body length which is quite a feat considering the average jumping spider is less than a quarter inch in size. 

Spiders or other pests creating problems in and around your home or yard this summer? Call Scout’s Pest Control at 864-469-4999 and schedule a complementary inspection today.

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